American College of Physicians: Internal Medicine — Doctors for Adults ®

Advertisement
Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Not your father's Medicare

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed in 2010, the most contentious provisions, which are still the subject of challenges in federal courts, were the establishment of state-wide insurance exchanges, the “individual mandate” that compels eligible citizens to buy insurance, and the expansion of state Medicaid programs. Less well appreciated, but arguably more important, were a wide range of reforms to the Medicare program. Summarized here, they touch on almost all aspects of the program, but I want to concentrate on just 1.

The law directed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to move Medicare from a strictly fee-for-service (FFS) payment model (“paying for volume”) to one in which the quality of care was factored into the payment received by hospitals and physicians (“paying for value”). As I have written previously, I believe this is the right move. There are just too many challenges to improving care and lowering costs that derive from “straight” FFS that is disconnected from any assessment of quality.

And while you may not have known that they grew out of the ACA, the payment reforms themselves have gotten a lot of attention. Penalties for readmissions, requirements for physician quality reporting, pilot programs for bundled payments and accountable care organizations are just of few of the Medicare reforms. Even though they currently influence a small percentage of overall Medicare spending, these changes may already be having a big impact on how care is delivered.

With that in mind, the announcement that CMS is going to aggressively ramp up the use of alternative payment models is big news. These graphics were taken from 1 of the accompanying documents that CMS also released:

Together they show that Medicare is going to change profoundly, and fast. Given its dominance as the biggest payer of health care services in the country, this is nothing short of revolutionary.

Lots can go wrong with trying to change this much this fast, but I think this is a big bold step in the right direction. What do you think?

Ira S. Nash, MD, FACP, is the senior vice president and executive director of the North Shore-LIJ Medical Group, and a professor of Cardiology and Population Health at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Diseases and was in the private practice of cardiology before joining the full-time faculty of Massachusetts General Hospital. He then held a number of senior positions at Mount Sinai Medical Center prior to joining North Shore-LIJ. He is married with two daughters and enjoys cars, reading biographies and histories, and following his favorite baseball team, the New York Yankees, when not practicing medicine. This post originally appeared at his blog, Ausculation.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

More

Monday, March 2, 2015

What the Northeast's snow preparedness can teach hospitals in winter

Significant snow in New England every winter is about as certain as sun in Florida every summer. When I moved to the USA from the south of (old) England to do my medical residency in Maryland, my first few years living in the United States were relatively snow-free. But when I started my first job as an Attending physician in central Massachusetts, I was in for a big shock. I had never yet shoveled snow in my life, but soon realized it was a rite of passage every winter in this part of the world.

Having now lived here for the last several years, I've become as used to it as all the seasoned New Englander's around me. Every winter the heavy snow invariably comes, and every winter I'm always impressed by how quickly towns and cities work to prepare beforehand and rush to clear the roads in lightning quick time afterwards. The large snow blizzards this winter, followed by more—again showed the importance of preparation for any big task (see the above picture of my car buried in the snow, the roads around it quickly cleared by the Boston snow plows within a couple of hours). Hundreds of trucks stood ready and hundreds of emergency personnel were drafted in for the clean-up efforts.

And sticking with this theme of winter, speaking as a doctor who has worked in a lot of different hospitals in the Northeast, I believe that hospitals can learn an awful lot from how towns and cities prepare for snowstorms. The typical scenario for hospitals goes something like this: winter comes and thousands more people fall sick: coughs, colds, pneumonias, and of course the dreaded flu. For the already sick and frail, it doesn't take much to push them over the edge to the point where they need a hospitalization. It happens every winter across the country, resulting in hospitals experiencing a “surge” of patients. Yet still every winter, many hospitals are taken off guard and struggle to cope with the increased need. Resources and staff are stretched, and ultimately patients have to wait longer for much needed services.

Instead of this situation always happening, hospitals could prepare better by:
• convening committees in the Fall to discuss and implement upcoming winter arrangements,
• creating a nursing staffing winter schedule to ensure a “float pool” of extra nurses,
• having for certain medical specialties such as Emergency Medicine and Hospital Medicine a special winter schedule that includes extra available physicians, made well in advance (not at the last minute),
• forming arrangements with neighboring hospitals for emergent bed diversion situations, and
• planning to reduce the volume of elective cases such as orthopedic surgeries during winter months in order to free up beds for other medical cases.

Winter patient surges for hospitals are only likely to become more severe with the ageing population and increase in chronic conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure. Rather than being caught out, hospitals would do well to remember what Benjamin Franklin said about any big task: “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

Suneel Dhand, MD, ACP Member, is a practicing physician in Massachusetts. He has published numerous articles in clinical medicine, covering a wide range of specialty areas including; pulmonology, cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, and infectious disease. He has also authored chapters in the prestigious "5-Minute Clinical Consult" medical textbook. His other clinical interests include quality improvement, hospital safety, hospital utilization, and the use of technology in health care. This post originally appeared at his blog.

Labels: , , , , ,

More

Mickey, Minnie, measles

It's a world of measles, a world of flu.
It's a world of mumps and pertussis too.
It's a world that we share,
but please stand over there.
It's a small world after all.
—My new proposed lyrics for the ride ‘It's A Small World’

In December I wrote that 2014 was a banner year for measles in the U.S.. Take a moment to read that post if you want a refresher on the symptoms and history of measles.

Well, gentle reader, if you were hoping that 2015 would be the year that humans make inroads against measles, I fear you'll be disappointed. So far, it looks like 2015 will be a year in which unvaccinated people gather in large groups and get infected. We've had more measles cases in California in January than in all of last year.

The California Department of Public Health has counted 59 cases of measles in California this year. 42 of these cases, including 5 Disney employees, are associated with an initial exposure at the Disney amusement parks in Anaheim in December. It is known that subsequently some patients visited the parks in January while infectious.

Vaccination status is known for 34 of the 59 cases. 28 of the 34 were unvaccinated. Six were infants too young to be vaccinated. Health officials are still investigating multiple people who may have come into contact with known patients.

This outbreak has led the Department of Public Health to advise that unvaccinated people not visit crowded places with a large number of international visitors. That's a reasonable start. Vaccinating everyone in line at “It's A Small World” might be even better.

What to do if you don't know if you've been vaccinated? If you were born before 1957 it's safe to assume you're immune, since virtually everyone in that generation was exposed to measles. Everyone else should have 2 doses of MMR. The first dose is usually given at 12 to 15 months of age, and the second at age 4 to 6.

If you're not sure if you received both doses, your doctor can just give you another MMR dose, or she can check a blood test to see if you're immune. When it comes to infectious diseases, wishing upon a star might not be enough.

Learn more:
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Hits 59 Cases And Counting (NPR)
Unvaccinated People Warned to Avoid Disneyland Resort (Wall Street Journal)
Measles advisory (California Department of Public Health)
Measles Makes a Comeback (my post in December)

Albert Fuchs, MD, FACP, graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, where he also did his internal medicine training. Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Fuchs spent three years as a full-time faculty member at UCLA School of Medicine before opening his private practice in Beverly Hills in 2000. Holding privileges at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, he is also an assistant clinical professor at UCLA's Department of Medicine. This post originally appeared at his blog.

Labels: , , , ,

More

Friday, February 27, 2015

Vaccinations, measles outbreak and reasonable and civil discourse

Lately there has been an outbreak of measles, a vaccine preventable disease, along with an outbreak of people yelling at each other. There have been angry exchanges between people who would like all children vaccinated according to the recommended guidelines and people who support the rights of parents to choose which vaccines to give their children, if any, and when to give them. There has been much focus on the assertion, particularly, that the Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccination (MMR) might cause autism. There is no believable evidence to support that assertion, but the questions of whether vaccination is safe and whether it should be required are much more interesting.

Yay vaccines!

I am a big fan of vaccination as a means of fighting disease. It is an ingenious concept. The recipient of a vaccination gets an injection or oral dose of a weakened virus or bacterium or an inactive part of one, which causes the body's own immune system to produce cells that will recognize and kill the real virus or bacterium if it enters the body at some future date. Vaccinations are so much more elegant than antibiotics, which are chemicals that are broadly active against a whole bunch of different agents and only last until the body inactivates or excretes them. Vaccines stimulate the body's own very complex and amazingly effective systems for fighting infection in much the same way that natural infections or exposures would. These systems are then available to prevent disease whenever the need arises.

Herd immunity, that's how vaccines eradicate diseases

Vaccines are ingenious at the individual level, but they are even more ingenious on the level of populations. A vaccine raises an individual's resistance to a disease, but each individual is still somewhat vulnerable to that disease because the body's defenses are not absolute. Some vaccines are more effective than others, and some people have a more robust response than others. Infectious diseases persist in our communities because they move from one person to another. If the vast majority of people in the community are immune to a disease, as can be achieved with vaccination, the disease cannot be transmitted and will die out. The few people in the population who are not immune are protected by the many who are since the likelihood of coming into contact with someone with an active infection in such a community is very low. This effect is known as “herd immunity“ and is one of the primary reasons that we should care about whether other people get vaccinated.

Curing smallpox

The word “vaccination” comes from the word root for cow, since the first vaccine in common use was derived from cows to fight smallpox. It had been observed that dairy maids who were infected with cowpox, a pustular disease, from touching the udders of infected cows did not get smallpox. In 1796 the physician Edward Jenner created a vaccine from that virus which became widely used. In 1979, smallpox, which killed as many as 500 million people in the 20th century alone, was declared eradicated. The vaccine was mandatory for school children, and I'm pretty sure I got it when I was a kid. It usually left a little scar on the upper arm but otherwise only rarely had side effects. Once in a while, when a child had something that predisposed him or her to more serious infections, the vaccination would cause an overall body pustular rash which was very nasty. The vaccine is no longer in common use, but still exists, especially for preventing the tropical disease monkeypox, which is similar to smallpox but milder.

Goodbye, polio

Other vaccine successes include polio, which was a virus that primarily infected children via the fecal-oral route, and caused paralysis, which was often fatal or disabling for life. The first vaccine was produced by Dr. Jonas Salk and was an injectable dead virus, and the second, close on its heels, was an oral vaccine that was a live attenuated virus (meaning it resembled the active virus but didn't cause polio.) Polio has been wiped out in most developed countries now due to vaccination, though it still breaks out in countries where vaccination is less common.

Measles, mumps and rubella

The measles vaccine was first licensed in 1962 and improved in 1968. It was combined with vaccines against mumps and rubella to create the MMR in 1971. It is estimated that the vaccine, in its first 20 years, prevented 52 million cases of measles, 17,400 cases of mental retardation due to measles effects on the brain, and 5,200 deaths.

Measles causes fever, runny eyes and nose, a cough, a typical spotty rash and sometimes sore throat and spots in the mouth. I saw a case in Africa in a very miserable infant who probably had measles related pneumonia and had a reasonable chance of dying of the disease.

Globally, measles vaccination has had a staggering impact. In the year 2000 it is estimated that over 700,000 people died of measles, primarily children, making it the 5th leading cause of death in kids. With a UNICEF backed measles immunization strategy, measles infections and deaths were reduced by 74% by the year 2010. Africa and India are major measles hot spots. There is no specific treatment for measles, so the only thing physicians can do is support the patient with fluids or oxygen if necessary and try to make sure the disease doesn't spread to others who might be vulnerable. Measles is very contagious. The vaccine, however, is very effective in preventing the disease. Rubella is another spots and fever disease, and can cause serious birth defects if a pregnant mother is infected with it. I had that one when I was a wee child and it didn't seem too bad, but I hope I didn't infect any pregnant people. There was no commonly available vaccine at that time. Mumps is a virus that causes swelling of the lymph nodes and can infect a young man's testicles, sometimes resulting in infertility. The vaccine is quite effective in preventing it, but not nearly as good for mumps as it is for measles.

Autism connection? Nope.

MMR is the vaccine at the center of the present controversy. In 1998 Andrew Wakefield, a gastroenterologist in England, reported 8 cases of children who developed autistic symptoms and gastrointestinal symptoms within 1 month of receiving the MMR vaccine. He proposed that the vaccine was causative, despite the fact that there was no obvious reason why it should be and there was no increase in cases of autism in the period after the MMR vaccine was introduced in England. His data was later questioned and thought to be fraudulent and the paper was retracted. Many studies have been done since then and have not shown any believable evidence that MMR causes autism, yet there are many people who still believe the vaccine/autism connection. Autism does present in early life and vaccines are given in early life, so a reasonable parent with a child who develops autism might suspect that the vaccine caused the autism, even though it did not.

But wait … not necessarily all good

Although it seems pretty clear that MMR doesn't cause autism, vaccines are not all benign and there are many diverse vaccines in common use. In the first 18 months of life the Centers for Disease Control recommends that a child receive about 24 immunizations, if I am reading this chart correctly. If successful, the vaccinations might prevent pneumonia, hepatitis, meningitis, chickenpox and the shingles that can follow in later years, tetanus, which can be fatal, whooping cough, most ear infections and rotavirus gastroenteritis. Also, of course, measles, mumps and rubella.

But this is a lot of shots. Each one might cause muscle aches, listlessness and injection site redness and swelling. Children also often cry really hard and want never to go back to the doctor's office. The shot that prevents whooping cough can occasionally cause high fever and seizures and sometimes, though rarely, results in a temporary floppy unresponsive state that can't be a good thing. The reformulated version of this, which has been available for decades now, is less likely to cause these side effects, but the reactions still occur. The rubella part of the MMR can cause chronic arthritis in adults who are rubella immune if they receive MMR to boost their measles immunity.

Other vaccine greats

There are also immunizations for older children and adults which are just as miraculous and just as much of a concern with regard to side effects. These are recommended for various subgroups and situations, but not required for school aged children. This is a list of all of the vaccines available in the U.S. One of my favorites on this list is the chickenpox vaccination. I must have been an odd and solitary child because I never got chickenpox. My twin got it when she was in her 20s and was really sick. She still has scars from it. Chickenpox is usually an annoying skin rash, with lots of small blisters that scab after a few days, but those little blisters can occur in the mouth and esophagus which makes eating and swallowing very difficult, and the virus can cause severe pneumonia.

When I was in my 30s they released the chickenpox vaccine and I got one. Since that time I have been exposed to chickenpox, which is incredibly contagious, many times without getting the disease. This means that I, and the generation of children that have gotten that vaccine will never get shingles, which is a reactivation of chickenpox which causes pain and skin lesions, sometimes with lifelong pain and scarring. Despite the fact that the flu shot is sometimes disappointingly ineffective, I happily submit to it yearly because the flu is such a nasty disease and vaccination lowers my risk of getting it or makes it less severe if I do.

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is also a winner. It is indicated in girls and boys to prevent genital warts that can cause cervical and penile cancer. It is still expensive and hasn't been embraced universally yet, partly because genital warts can also be prevented by having only one sexual partner for life and making sure that he or she has never had sexual contact with anyone else. Some parents forego the vaccine for their children because they believe that this will be achievable. Cervical cancer kills 4,000 women yearly and results in fertility threatening surgery and treatments in many more. The HPV vaccine could prevent these outcomes and potentially also make the dreaded pap smear obsolete.

Yellow fever: not without its problems

The yellow fever vaccine is both wonderful and terrible. In the 1600s yellow fever came from Africa to the Americas and eventually to Europe with captured African slaves. Yellow fever is so named because it causes liver failure with jaundice. It also causes nausea, vomiting, kidney failure and diffuse bleeding. It killed more soldiers in the Spanish American war than battle injuries. It slowed work on the Panama Canal and infected people in Boston and other U.S. port cities.

In the early 1900s it was found to be caused by the bite of the Aedis aegyptimosquito and mosquito control led to significantly better control of the disease. It was still a considerable problem in places where mosquitoes could not be controlled so a vaccine was created in 1930 which has been very effective in reducing disease. Travelers to parts of South America and Africa are still at risk, as are residents. Unfortunately the vaccine can rarely cause a version of yellow fever in some people and can cause a fatal inflammation of the brain. The newer version of the vaccine is less likely to cause these side effects, but they can still occur. Despite the known side effects, travelers to many countries need to provide proof of vaccination in order to enter if they are arriving from an area with known risk of yellow fever.

The Swine Flu debacle

In 1976 there was an outbreak of swine flu (H1N1 influenza) in Fort Dix, N.J. One army recruit died, and there was fear that this virus, which was similar to the one that caused the influenza pandemic in 1918, would spread across the country. In fact, the only infections were at Fort Dix and 40 million Americans were vaccinated against it, resulting in quite a number of cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, an immune mediated paralysis that can result from both infections and vaccinations. On the bright side, apparently immunity from that vaccine did last until the most recent pandemic in 2009, so the folks who got that vaccine were less likely to come down with our most recent H1N1.

Where do we stand, legally?

The laws about vaccinating children differ by state. All states require some vaccinations in order to attend school, but some states offer exemptions, not just on the basis of medical issues such as immune system diseases, but on the basis of parents' religious or philosophical beliefs or values. With the recent measles outbreak, children who did not receive measles vaccination are being kept out of school, and some schools in California have reported up to 65% of students not being fully vaccinated due to their parent's objections. Some suggest more stringent requirements for vaccination, eliminating exemptions on the basis of religious or philosophical beliefs. West Virginia has already taken this step and several other states have only medical and religious exemptions.

Stupid people? Not so fast …

So are “anti-vaxxers” stupid and selfish? I don't think so. At least not necessarily more so than anyone else. Some of their concerns are not really valid, like worrying about the presence of tiny amounts of mercury as a preservative in some vaccines (hardly any now) and the possibility that multiple vaccines given at the same time will overwhelm the immune system (it's actually built for that: picture what happens when a child eats a handful of dirt.) There are some reasonable arguments against vaccinating ones children, even though I may not agree with them. Since vaccination protects the population and because it can be a big money maker for clinics, pharmacies and drug companies, it would not be surprising if we didn't hear much about occasional side effects. So suspicion is not entirely unwarranted.

As a loving parent it is hard to be a party to 24 immunizations before the age of 18 months, especially since most of them involve sticking a needle into tender baby flesh. When a disease, like measles, seems to be vanishingly rare, how wise is it to expose one's children to an immunization which definitely has associated side effects (though not autism)? Some of the parents who reasoned in this way now have children with measles and many more have children who aren't able to attend school because they are not vaccinated. Are they selfish? They probably didn't think they were, but the vaccine isn't 100% effective and it isn't given until after a child's first birthday, so infection with measles does put other children, especially babies, at risk of measles and its complications.

Civil discourse—perhaps we should give it a try

How do we, as a society, want to deal with this issue? Americans are fiercely individualistic compared to many other countries, and we usually tell the government that they have no jurisdiction when it comes to our personal decisions. We draw the line (but it's a very wiggly one) at personal decisions that put our children or other people at risk. That's how our rules about vaccination came about in the first place. We, as physicians and nurses, now tell people about side effects of vaccines at the time they are administered, but we don't, in fact, allow them to refuse them for their children unless they also want to opt out of public school, except in the case of religious or philosophical beliefs. Do we want to close those loopholes as well?

What we really ought to do is have civil and respectful conversations. We should carefully weigh both the value of controlling vaccine preventable and otherwise untreatable diseases against the actual observed side effects of vaccines. We want to support scrutiny by organizations that have as little vested interest as possible, such as the CDC. We want both sides, vaxxers and anti-vaxxers to avoid black and white thinking.

Janice Boughton, MD, ACP Member, practiced in the Seattle area for four years and in rural Idaho for 17 years before deciding to take a few years off to see more places, learn more about medicine and increase her knowledge base and perspective by practicing hospital and primary care medicine as a locum tenens physician. She lives in Idaho when not traveling. Disturbed by various aspects of the practice of medicine that make no sense and concerned about the cost of providing health care to every American, she blogs at Why is American Health Care So Expensive?, where this post originally appeared.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

More

Older Posts   

Contact ACP Internist

Send comments to ACP Internist staff at acpinternist@acponline.org.

Blog log

Members of the American College of Physicians contribute posts from their own sites to ACP Internistand ACP Hospitalist. Contributors include:

Albert Fuchs, MD
Albert Fuchs, MD, FACP, graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, where he also did his internal medicine training. Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Fuchs spent three years as a full-time faculty member at UCLA School of Medicine before opening his private practice in Beverly Hills in 2000.

And Thus, It Begins
Amanda Xi, ACP Medical Student Member, is a first-year medical student at the OUWB School of Medicine, charter class of 2015, in Rochester, Mich., from which she which chronicles her journey through medical training from day 1 of medical school.

Auscultation
Ira S. Nash, MD, FACP, is the senior vice president and executive director of the North Shore-LIJ Medical Group, and a professor of Cardiology and Population Health at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Diseases and was in the private practice of cardiology before joining the full-time faculty of Massachusetts General Hospital.

Zackary Berger
Zackary Berger, MD, ACP Member, is a primary care doctor and general internist in the Division of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins. His research interests include doctor-patient communication, bioethics, and systematic reviews.

Controversies in Hospital Infection Prevention
Run by three ACP Fellows, this blog ponders vexing issues in infection prevention and control, inside and outside the hospital. Daniel J Diekema, MD, FACP, practices infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, and hospital epidemiology in Iowa City, Iowa, splitting time between seeing patients with infectious diseases, diagnosing infections in the microbiology laboratory, and trying to prevent infections in the hospital. Michael B. Edmond, MD, FACP, is a hospital epidemiologist in Richmond, Va., with a focus on understanding why infections occur in the hospital and ways to prevent these infections, and sees patients in the inpatient and outpatient settings. Eli N. Perencevich, MD, ACP Member, is an infectious disease physician and epidemiologist in Iowa City, Iowa, who studies methods to halt the spread of resistant bacteria in our hospitals (including novel ways to get everyone to wash their hands).

db's Medical Rants
Robert M. Centor, MD, FACP, contributes short essays contemplating medicine and the health care system.

Suneel Dhand, MD, ACP Member
Suneel Dhand, MD, ACP Member, is a practicing physician in Massachusetts. He has published numerous articles in clinical medicine, covering a wide range of specialty areas including; pulmonology, cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, and infectious disease. He has also authored chapters in the prestigious "5-Minute Clinical Consult" medical textbook. His other clinical interests include quality improvement, hospital safety, hospital utilization, and the use of technology in health care.

DrDialogue
Juliet K. Mavromatis, MD, FACP, provides a conversation about health topics for patients and health professionals.

Dr. Mintz' Blog
Matthew Mintz, MD, FACP, has practiced internal medicine for more than a decade and is an Associate Professor of Medicine at an academic medical center on the East Coast. His time is split between teaching medical students and residents, and caring for patients.

Everything Health
Toni Brayer, MD, FACP, blogs about the rapid changes in science, medicine, health and healing in the 21st century.

FutureDocs
Vineet Arora, MD, FACP, is Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency and Assistant Dean of Scholarship & Discovery at the Pritzker School of Medicine for the University of Chicago. Her education and research focus is on resident duty hours, patient handoffs, medical professionalism, and quality of hospital care. She is also an academic hospitalist.

Glass Hospital
John H. Schumann, MD, FACP, provides transparency on the workings of medical practice and the complexities of hospital care, illuminates the emotional and cognitive aspects of caregiving and decision-making from the perspective of an active primary care physician, and offers behind-the-scenes portraits of hospital sanctums and the people who inhabit them.

Gut Check
Ryan Madanick, MD, ACP Member, is a gastroenterologist at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and the Program Director for the GI & Hepatology Fellowship Program. He specializes in diseases of the esophagus, with a strong interest in the diagnosis and treatment of patients who have difficult-to-manage esophageal problems such as refractory GERD, heartburn, and chest pain.

I'm dok
Mike Aref, MD, PhD, FACP, is an academic hospitalist with an interest in basic and clinical science and education, with interests in noninvasive monitoring and diagnostic testing using novel bedside imaging modalities, diagnostic reasoning, medical informatics, new medical education modalities, pre-code/code management, palliative care, patient-physician communication, quality improvement, and quantitative biomedical imaging.

Informatics Professor
William Hersh, MD, FACP, Professor and Chair, Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, posts his thoughts on various topics related to biomedical and health informatics.

David Katz, MD
David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACP, is an internationally renowned authority on nutrition, weight management, and the prevention of chronic disease, and an internationally recognized leader in integrative medicine and patient-centered care.

Just Oncology
Richard Just, MD, ACP Member, has 36 years in clinical practice of hematology and medical oncology. His blog is a joint publication with Gregg Masters, MPH.

KevinMD
Kevin Pho, MD, ACP Member, offers one of the Web's definitive sites for influential health commentary.

MD Whistleblower
Michael Kirsch, MD, FACP, addresses the joys and challenges of medical practice, including controversies in the doctor-patient relationship, medical ethics and measuring medical quality. When he's not writing, he's performing colonoscopies.

Medical Lessons
Elaine Schattner, MD, FACP, shares her ideas on education, ethics in medicine, health care news and culture. Her views on medicine are informed by her past experiences in caring for patients, as a researcher in cancer immunology, and as a patient who's had breast cancer.

Mired in MedEd
Alexander M. Djuricich, MD, FACP, is the Associate Dean for Continuing Medical Education (CME), and a Program Director in Medicine-Pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, where he blogs about medical education.

More Musings
Rob Lamberts, MD, ACP Member, a med-peds and general practice internist, returns with "volume 2" of his personal musings about medicine, life, armadillos and Sasquatch at More Musings (of a Distractible Kind).

Prescriptions
David M. Sack, MD, FACP, practices general gastroenterology at a small community hospital in Connecticut. His blog is a series of musings on medicine, medical care, the health care system and medical ethics, in no particular order.

Reflections of a Grady Doctor
Kimberly Manning, MD, FACP, reflects on the personal side of being a doctor in a community hospital in Atlanta.

The Blog of Paul Sufka
Paul Sufka, MD, ACP Member, is a board certified rheumatologist in St. Paul, Minn. He was a chief resident in internal medicine with the University of Minnesota and then completed his fellowship training in rheumatology in June 2011 at the University of Minnesota Department of Rheumatology. His interests include the use of technology in medicine.

Technology in (Medical) Education
Neil Mehta, MBBS, MS, FACP, is interested in use of technology in education, social media and networking, practice management and evidence-based medicine tools, personal information and knowledge management.

Peter A. Lipson, MD
Peter A. Lipson, MD, ACP Member, is a practicing internist and teaching physician in Southeast Michigan. The blog, which has been around in various forms since 2007, offers musings on the intersection of science, medicine, and culture.

Why is American Health Care So Expensive?
Janice Boughton, MD, FACP, practiced internal medicine for 20 years before adopting a career in hospital and primary care medicine as a locum tenens physician. She lives in Idaho when not traveling.

World's Best Site
Daniel Ginsberg, MD, FACP, is an internal medicine physician who has avidly applied computers to medicine since 1986, when he first wrote medically oriented computer programs. He is in practice in Tacoma, Washington.

Other blogs of note:

American Journal of Medicine
Also known as the Green Journal, the American Journal of Medicine publishes original clinical articles of interest to physicians in internal medicine and its subspecialities, both in academia and community-based practice.

Clinical Correlations
A collaborative medical blog started by Neil Shapiro, MD, ACP Member, associate program director at New York University Medical Center's internal medicine residency program. Faculty, residents and students contribute case studies, mystery quizzes, news, commentary and more.

Interact MD
Michael Benjamin, MD, ACP member, doesn't accept industry money so he can create an independent, clinician-reviewed space on the Internet for physicians to report and comment on the medical news of the day.

PLoS Blog
The Public Library of Science's open access materials include a blog.

White Coat Rants
One of the most popular anonymous blogs written by an emergency room physician.

Powered by Blogger

RSS feed