Blog | Thursday, December 23, 2010

QD: News Every Day--About that placebo effect. . .


Placebos helped ease symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome even when patients knew that was what they were taking, a new study reports.

Researchers randomly assigned 80 patients with IBS to receive placebo pills (openly labeled as such) or no treatment over a three-week period. Patients taking placebos had significantly higher mean scores on the IBS Global Improvement Scale at 11 and 21 days, and also reported significant improvements in symptom severity and relief. The results of the study, which was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, were published online Dec. 22 by PLoS ONE.

Anthony Lembo, MD, a study coauthor, said in a press release that he didn't expect the placebo to work. "I felt awkward asking patients to literally take a placebo. But to my surprise, it seemed to work for many of them," he said.

Ted Kaptchuk, OMD, the study's lead author, told the LA Times that a larger study needs to be done to confirm the findings, and said that he didn't believe such effects would be possible "without a positive doctor-patient relationship."

ACP Internist looked at placebos' place in clinical practice in a 2009 article. (PLoS ONE, Public Library of Science, LA Times, ACP Internist)

[Editor's Note: QD--News Every Day will resume publishing on Jan. 3, 2011]