Blog | Monday, April 1, 2013

Watch medical students celebrate residency Match Day


The residency Match ended in March. For those unaware of this annual event close to the end of medical school, students interview with and rank residency programs, and programs do the same with interviewing medical students. Information about the results of the Match can be found here.

Students found out their individual Match results on Friday, March 15, 2013, opening envelopes with the name of the program where they are headed for their residency training. It is an incredibly anxiety-provoking yet exciting event that most physicians remember for years to come.

From the program point of view, I am ecstatic to see the names of the medical students I have the privilege of training for the next four years after they graduate in a few months. This year was no exception. I couldn't be prouder of the students matched to my program! The joy that comes from observing the opening of the envelope and just knowing where one will spend the next few years is a sight to behold.

With the advent of smartphones and tablets that can capture moments like Match Day easily, it is exciting to see how different schools approach this rite of passage. There was even a Twitter handle to capture the information across the country: #Match2013. Below is a short list of how some medical schools "observe" Match Day. The list is certainly not exhaustive, but is fascinating to show how different schools approach Match Day festivities:
Baylor
Cincinnati
Einstein
Michigan

And some, like my own institution, Indiana University School of Medicine, found students who threw a bit of humor into the day:
Indiana

Congratulations to all of the students who matched! May your futures be bright, and may your passion for caring for patients continue to flourish!

Alexander M. Djuricich, MD, FACP, is Associate Dean for Continuing Medical Education and a Program Director in Medicine-Pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. This post originally appeared at Mired in MedEd, where he blogs about medical education.