Blog | Monday, October 19, 2015

Medicare audits, or how I spent part of Labor Day Weekend


Some weekends I go to my office to try and catch up on paperwork. This Labor Day weekend I had to “labor” away part of it to satisfy a Medicare requirement.

I received a fax from a medical supplier saying that Medicare had sent them an, “additional documentation request” for diabetic supplies for a patient of mine from June 2013. I didn't see her on the date of service they listed, nor even see that I prescribed any diabetic testing supplies then, though it's possible I filed out a faxed form and it wasn't saved to her chart.

They requested that I include copies of the patient's blood glucose testing logs. I do not routinely scan those into the chart, so I don't know how that's supposed to happen.

They also say to verify that the records contain the following other items, though it could be considered fraud to go back and add them now:
• patient's diagnosis and prognosis
• patient's testing frequency
• condition and treatment history
• quantity and day supply prescribed
• physical limitations due to condition
• A1c lab report
• insulin/non-insulin
• insulin injections/pump
• medication lists

In addition, they want all documentation from 6 months before the service date up to the present day, and they want it, “ASAP.” That's 2 years and 9 months of documentation, all for a few diabetic test strips I prescribed (which I don't make any money from, for the record)!

What's more, it says that we are not allowed to charge the supplier or the beneficiary (the patient) for providing this information.

That's your government, hard at putting us primary care doctors to work.

Daniel Ginsberg, MD, FACP, is an internal medicine physician who has avidly applied computers to medicine since 1986, when he first wrote medically oriented computer programs. He is in practice in Tacoma, Washington. This post originally appeared on his blog, World's Best Site.