Blog | Friday, May 12, 2017

How to age better depends on where you live


At GlassHospital we strive to bring you interesting ideas about improving health and health care from places far and wide:

An article in the Saskatoon (Saskatchewan) StarPhoenix features Suellen Beatty, CEO of the Sherbrooke Community Centre in Canada.

Sherbrooke is a community center, but it also is home to more than 250 residents—the kind of place we might call a nursing home in the U.S. I love that in Canada they're called Community Centres. That's what any facility or neighborhood should strive for.

Suellen Beatty rejects the idea that nursing homes are places where people go to await death. Her team's philosophy is to make old age more fun. Sherbrooke readily acknowledges the big three elements that compound the infirmities of aging: Loneliness, helplessness, and boredom.

By loading up the day with activities, by listening to their residents and families, and by hosting hundreds of volunteers who see their job as providing fun and emotional sustenance to resident and day-visitor elders, Sherbrooke attracts visitors from all over the world who marvel at its success.

It reminds me a of a piece we ran a few years ago about a pretty special elder care facility in Arizona–one that put its residents' happiness and comfort above all else—even when it means deviating from standard protocols of elder care like eating bland food.

Take a look at what's going on in Saskatchewan. We can all learn.

This post by John H. Schumann, MD, FACP, originally appeared at GlassHospital. Dr. Schumann is a general internist. His blog, GlassHospital, seeks to bring transparency to medical practice and to improve the patient experience.